The London Gigapixel Story Writing Competition

by Walter Ketcham, AdHub.com

Shot from the top of the Centre Point Building (36 stories high) in central London over three days last summer, photographer Jeffrey Martin stitched together 7,886 individual photos into an amazing 80-gigapixel panorama that can be zoomed in and out for a view of London that captures, not only its overall grandeur, but intimate details like license plate numbers, faces, and wallpaper inside people’s apartments. Click to view the London Gigapixel

“I used a digital SLR camera and a 400mm lens,” says Martin. “I also used a special custom-built robotic camera mount, which moved the camera for me. This made shooting more bearable (but still really difficult).” He used AutoPano Pro software for stitching the images together and creating the flowing panoramic effect. The final image is 400,000 x 200,000 pixels. Printed at 300dpi it would be about 100 x 50 feet.”

Gigapixel Competitions
To encourage people to explore the 80-gigapixel image of London in its finest detail, 360 Cities will launch three separate contests to find and describe items or places in the photo.

“The first two competitions “treasure hunt” type games, and will require you to find stuff in the image, and be quick. If you are, you can win either some camera / computer bags from Crumpler, or a 27 inch LCD Monitor from Fujitsu! You can read about these treasure hunts over on the Gigapixel Page.”

“The third competition, launching in beginning of December, is something new, and I’m not sure it’s even been done before, which is really exciting! It is a storytelling competition. Using the London Gigapixel image, you’ll be able to write your own story, using parts of the London Gigapixel image itself – zoom in (or out) on any part of the image, put a sentence (or more) there, and repeat, until you have a story. Publish this story to the Web; you and your friends can vote on the best stories, and win more than $3000 in holiday-related prizes from Urban Adventures and Homeaway.” Details Here.

Regarding the incredible detail in the London Gigapixel, Martin says, “The last time we checked, it is perfectly legal to practice the art of photography in most places on planet Earth. We have blurred out the faces of identifiable children, because as we understand it, it is a tremendous crime to photograph and publish images of children without the consent of their parents. We also blurred out one ‘naughty bit’.”

Jeffrey Martin is the founder of 360Cities.net, a panoramic photography blog site that allows members to upload their own panoramas and take advantage of software for highlighting objects or places within each panorama. You’ll find hundreds of breathtaking panoramas from around the world.

“360 Cities is dedicated to promoting geo-located, high-resolution spherical imagery by providing the best – anywhere platform for publishing panoramic photography on the web. 360Cities.net is the web’s largest collection of spherical, map-based panoramas, and through its partnership with Google Earth, this content is introduced to an even wider audience worldwide. 360 Cities is a Netherlands limited company with a subsidiary in Prague, Czech Republic.”
Contact Jeffrey Martin 360 Cities jeffrey@360cities.net

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{ 2 comments }

mk November 19, 2010 at 8:24 pm

You needn’t go to 80 gigapixels to see the rooms inside the windows or the actual expressions on people’s faces vs. the way they seem in small format. You can see it all in your family photo prints from the ‘1920’s and earlier.

You can see intimate details with frightening clarity in satellite photos, too, should you have access to them. Photographic invasiveness is hardly new; but, government intelligence doesn’t rub your face in it.

I’m horrified that the same and better quality technology is available at ground level, accessible to any Joe photographer, ethics notwithstanding. The sense of unprincipled entitlement, the arrogance, in this paragraph, quoted below, below chills my blood:

“Regarding the incredible detail in the London Gigapixel, Martin says, “The last time we checked, it is perfectly legal to practice the art of photography in most places on planet Earth. We have blurred out the faces of identifiable children, because as we understand it, it is a tremendous crime to photograph and publish images of children without the consent of their parents. We also blurred out one ‘naughty bit’.”

Walter Ketcham November 22, 2010 at 5:56 pm

In the future, every detail of our lives will be recorded and available for playback. No need to wait till you stand before St. Peter at the Pearly Gates. The world will cast their judgment on your Facebook Wall.

Related: Must see film: Defending Your Life Albert Brooks, Director and stars with Meryl Streep. In order to stay in heaven, Brooks must watch videos of select moments in his life and defend his actions.

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